Wednesday, 3 December 2014

Truth required about Tinnitus cure

As someone with long-term tinnitus, I was curious when this turned up in my spam folder: Reverse My Tinnitus, by Dr. James Phillips and Alan Watson. It was a heavy spam attack, at least 6 copies in a day. I opened it, and it was one of those enormously irritating videos that promises to tell you something but spends many minutes simply repeating the same assertions. Eventually of course we get to the kill zone, where we are told that it's a diet plan to stimulate the production of antibodies that cause remyelination of the nerves responsible for the problem. The ebook that tells you how to do this costs $39, and the buyer is threatened with price rises if he or she does not buy it immediately.
So far, we have something which stinks of a scam - the high spam level, the aggressive 'I'll wear you down' marketing, and the absurdly high cost of a book which is supposedly based on mainstream science.
So I sat down at the keyboard and googled for reviews of this book.
Guess what? All 6 links on the first google page that claimed to be reviews were actually plugs for the book. Including one called 'Is Alan Watson Scam?' (sic) and even one called Reverse My Tinnitus Reviews Expose Dr James Phillips. Which does nothing of the kind.
Of course, these signs in themselves do not prove it to be a scam, but if it isn't, then I've never come across any product marketing which creates such a strong impression of scamming!
Next step was to look at Dr Phillips's publications. He certainly has an impressive list of papers on neural damage and neuronal sheath studies. He seems to be the real deal.
So, the fact that someone such as Dr Phillips, who seems to have nothing to hide, allows his name to be associated with this desperate hard-sell, does rather indicate that the good doctor regards the 'cure' as at least harmless, and maybe with some potential for effectiveness.
So, does anyone out there have any idea of the truth behind these claims? Anyone with any knowledge of Dr Phillips? Anyone yet found a genuine, honest review of the book?

7 comments:

  1. I agree is smells like a scam and I haven't been able to find anything out there to lead me otherwise.

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  2. I can find NO Dr James Phillips in connection with Oxford university in any web searches I've done. I believe that this tinnitus 'cure' is a total hoax that has a elaborate system of fake search sites promoting the book while claiming to be investigatory. Beware!!!

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  3. Good research there ussgreen, thanks for that.

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  4. I have just phoned Oxford university ( Feb 12 2015 11.40 gmt ) and i can tell you the Dr james phillips does NOT and NEVER has worked there so this is a total scam and should be avoided like the plague ..

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  5. I have just phoned Oxford university ( Feb 12 2015 11.40 gmt ) and i can tell you the Dr james phillips does NOT and NEVER has worked there so this is a total scam and should be avoided like the plague ..

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  6. Thanks Billy, nice bit of fact-finding!

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  7. My daughter suffered from a terrible tinnitus for more than 25 years which
    started after she turned 5 we all thought it will end but got even worse as
    days went by. We tried all several treatments and therapy prescribed by
    various doctors we met but to no avail, she lost total concentration and
    screamed most times. She usually tells me she hears hissing and ringing
    noises. This were steady noise that disrupted her entire life, even at
    night she screams even more because the sounds become louder because
    everywhere is quiet and she slept less because of this. I was able to
    contact Dr.lewishill. on the matter and his medicine was able to restore
    her back to normal and she is very okay now without any side effects
    whatsoever. If you have Tinnitus, do not hesitate to contact him on
    drlewishill247@gmail.com for advice and for his product. I hope this helps
    someone out there.

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