Monday, 25 November 2019

Would You Know Yet More? The Runa Interviews with Edred Thorsson

Edited by Ian Read and Michael Moynihan
https://arcanaeuropamedia.com/collections/frontpage/products/would-you-know-yet-more-the-runa-interviews-with-edred-thorsson


This is one of many books that feature the words of Edred Thorsson, but it is the only one which involve an interviewer. The book consists mostly of the interviews conducted by Ian Read for his Rûna magazine, which ran from 1997 to 2009, plus a 2019 interview done by Joshua Buckley and Michael Moynihan.

Ian Read supplies a foreword, and the text is nicely organized according to the themes of the questions, so it's possible to follow an idea through the relevant chapter. The themes include:
- The Rune-Gild, Cosmology and the Gods, Monotheism and modernity;
- Asatru and the neopagan revival;
- The Woodharrow Institute;
- The Goths;
- J R R Tolkien, the Spear of Destiny and the Modern Mythos;
- Tradition and Modernity;
- Towards the Birth of an Odian Philosophy: Hans Naumann and Nietzsche's Ewige Wiederkunft.

There's a lot of high-powered ideas in here. I'll just pick a favourite. In the piece on Nietzsche and Odian philosophy, Thorsson makes a very interesting point about the history of thought:
'At present, our chief task in the development of a true philosophy rooted in timeless Germanic principles lies in the translation of mythic thought into theoretical thought. ... The process ... here is identical  to what happened in India, where mythic patterns encoded in the Rig Veda were used as sources for the theoretical concepts expressed in the Upanishads... A similar process took place in Greece, where Homeric myth became a springboard for the theoretical speculations of the Hellenic and Hellenistic philosophers.'
This possibility in Germanic thought was 'blocked by the onrush of Christian theology...', so that this process is only now being resumed.

In the same piece, writing on Nietzsche's idea of eternal return and how it can relate to the traditional Germanic idea of aptrborinn, of being born again within the clan, it becomes clear that we are not being reborn in order to be perfected. We do 'not look for far-off unknown blessings ... but rather we should live in the way that we want to live once again, and as we want to live for all eternity!'

Buy this book for what its title promises - as close as you'll get to the thoughts of the most influential contemporary teacher of the Germanic esoteric reawakening.

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