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Showing posts from April, 2016

Brief review of two books about William S Burroughs

https://www.amazon.co.uk/The-Magical-Universe-William-Burroughs/dp/1906958645?ie=UTF8&*Version*=1&*entries*=0 and https://www.amazon.co.uk/Scientologist-William-Burroughs-Weird-Cult/dp/0956952526?ie=UTF8&*Version*=1&*entries*=0 Books on WSB are getting better. I've just finished two very good ones. My darling bought me The Magical Universe of William S. Burroughs by Matthew Levi Stevens  and I just had to go and get what is more or less its unofficial companion volume, David S Wills's 'Scientologist: William S Burroughs and the 'Weird Cult '.' You know how it is with bibliophilia. The latter is a superb piece of work. Wills puts together a lot of archive material to shed light on WSB's few years of involvement in the Church of Scientology and the enduring effects on his thinking of some of Hubbard's ideas (such as the idea of engrams) and some of Scientology's practice (auditing and the E-meter). Present day readers may be su

Tyr journal, Northern esotericism and politics

This blog started off as a review of Tyr issue 4, and that review arose out of discussions about the (unfortunate) appearance of White Nationalism in Germanic esotericist writings. So the post expanded into an argument that White Nationalism is by no means typical of the Northern mysteries. Tyr: Myth, Culture, Tradition. Issue 4.  Edited by Joshua Buckley and Michael Moynihan Volume 4, 2014, ISSN 1538-9413, ISBN-13: 978-0-9720292-4-7, 6" x 9" perfectbound, illustrated, 430 pages. Tyr is an extraordinary publication, unlike any other. On the back cover of each edition the journal's mission is outlined: 'TYR celebrates the traditional myths, culture and social institutions of pre-Christian, pre-Modern Europe. It includes in-depth original articles, interviews, translations of essential works by radical traditionalist thinks, as well as extensive reviews of books, films, music, and the arts.' An answer is given to the question 'What does it mean to be a

Review of Wilhelm Reich - Biologist, by James E. Strick

Wilhelm Reich - Biologist, by James E. Strick, Harvard University Press, 2015. http://www.amazon.co.uk/Wilhelm-Reich-Biologist-James-Strick/dp/0674736095 I came of sexual age in the 1960s, when the so-called Sexual Revolution was already well underway. Widespread, reliable contraception had finally detached the sex act from the raw biology of reproduction. Young people were becoming much freer with their explorations of sex; long before I ever had sex with anyone else, I, in common with nearly all my contemporaries, embraced the zeitgeist - the idea of sexual freedom - in a spirit of hopeful anticipation. A few years later, reading Wilhelm Reich, my friends and I were digging back into the foundations of the Sexual Revolution, a phrase coined by Reich, a movement he hoped would arise and dissolve the bonds of locked-in sexual-emotional energy and lead to a better world. Reich was the erratic visionary who had looked forward to an era we were now living in. He wrote in Function of